Food Safety Hampered By Shutdown

Food costs push China inflation to 3.1 percent

Consumer prices rose 3.1% over a year earlier, government data showed on Monday. That was up from August’s 2.6% but below the Communist Party’s 3.5% target for the year. Persistently higher inflation could complicate efforts to keep China’s economic recovery on track by limiting the government’s ability to prop up growth with lower interest rates or stimulus spending. The country’s top economic official, Premier Li Keqiang, earlier said Beijing would try to keep economic growth above 7.5% for the year. “Inflation remains at benign levels in the near term,” said JP Morgan economist Haibin Zhu in a report. “The relatively benign inflation dynamics suggest that stabilizing growth and economic reform remain the priority issues for policymakers in the near term.” Companies and investors are looking to a November ruling party meeting at which leaders are expected to produce a blueprint for future economic reforms. Li and other leaders have promised changes in China’s financial system and more opportunities for entrepreneurs but have yet to release details. The September price rise was driven by an 18.9% jump in the cost of fresh vegetables. Holidays, drought and floods were partly responsible for the increase. Prices of non-food products rose 1.6%. The inflation figures come after China’s exports unexpectedly dropped in September while imports rose. Producer prices, which measure the cost of goods as they leave the factory, fell 1.3%, suggesting weak demand.

He made a ready-made mixture, or ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), and found 95 per cent of children had recovered from malnutrition within six weeks of eating the peanut butter paste. A child before treatment (left), two weeks into treatment (center) and six weeks after treatment started (right).Photo: Dr. Manary told news.com.au from west Africa that the evidence was overwhelming that the food has the potential to save millions of lives. The ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) can treat severe malnutrition anywhere on the planet, he said. And he said the success rates speak for themselves. This approach is beyond research and innovation, he said. Our team has treated more than 100,000 severely malnourished children with on average 90 per cent recovery. His nutrient-rich mixture has even been endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the best way to treat malnutrition. The high-calorie, fortified peanut butter-like food contains mono-unsaturated fats, which are easy to digest, and are rich in zinc and protein. It also has the added advantage of not needing to be refrigerated for months and doesnt require cooking. The so called super food provides the specific, high-quality nutrition children need to recover, survive, and even thrive and has been shown to raise the kids immunity to such a point where they can be saved from diseases and illness including Malaria. Dr. Manary said the peanut butter paste also meant mothers could treat their children in their own home. Previously, children suffering malnutrition required lengthy hospital stays away from their families for up to a couple of months which only had a 25-40 per cent success rate. When asked about the potential for peanut allergies and potential anaphylactic shock, Dr.

This week, a mother called us about her child hospitalized with a Salmonella poisoning from his day care’s chicken lunch. The child’s condition was tenuous, with a blood infection, and treatment was especially challenging as the bacteria was antibiotic resistant. The mom turned to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group, for information and help because key government’s public health agencies and websites are shut down. Does this have an impact on food safety? You betcha! Regardless of whether this illness is related to the outbreak linked to Foster Farms chickens , it illustrates that each case of illness is important to track, and protecting our families from unsafe food should be considered an essential function of government. When the shutdown began, the Food and Drug Administration announced it would have to halt most of its food safety activities, including routine inspections of food manufacturers and monitoring of imports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shuttered some of its key activities, including outbreak detection and infectious-disease surveillance. The U.S. Department of Agriculture kept its meat, poultry and egg inspectors on the job, but furloughed more than 1,200 other food safety workers.

This simple food could end world hunger

Consumer prices rose 3.1 percent over a year earlier, government data showed Monday. That was up from August’s 2.6 percent but below the Communist Party’s 3.5 percent target for the year. Persistently higher inflation could complicate efforts to keep China’s economic recovery on track by limiting the government’s ability to prop up growth with lower interest rates or stimulus spending. The country’s top economic official, Premier Li Keqiang, earlier said Beijing would try to keep economic growth above 7.5 percent for the year. “Inflation remains at benign levels in the near term,” said JP Morgan economist Haibin Zhu in a report. “The relatively benign inflation dynamics suggest that stabilizing growth and economic reform remain the priority issues for policymakers in the near term.” Companies and investors are looking to a November ruling party meeting at which leaders are expected to produce a blueprint for future economic reforms. Li and other leaders have promised changes in China’s financial system and more opportunities for entrepreneurs but have yet to release details. The September price rise was driven by an 18.9 percent jump in the cost of fresh vegetables. Holidays, drought and floods were partly responsible for the increase. Prices of non-food products rose 1.6 percent. The inflation figures come after China’s exports unexpectedly dropped in September while imports rose.